Aw, America.

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a dad and his son came into my job

they ended up wanting to buy a kid’s djembe but we were almost out of them and only had purple and yellow left. I handed him the yellow one to try since it was the one closer to me. the kid ended up liking it, so his dad said he would get it.

out of habit, I asked whether he wanted yellow or purple. The dad repeated the question and let the kid decide which color. the kid went with yellow, but it was nice to see the dad not be bothered with his son having the choice of picking between yellow and a stereotypically ‘girly’ purple color.

meanwhile, a mom came in last week and asked for a kid’s recorder. I showed her the ones we had on discount, which happened to be pink. she said ‘but he’s a boy’. I replied with ‘okay?’.

she immediately asked for blue because he had to have blue because he was a boy. i was all ‘ya okay whatever’ and started to pull out other recorders. the first one happened to be a light blue and before i could get to the ones deeper in the pile she jumped down my throat being all ‘NOT THAT BLUE. it’s too light and girly’. I was all ‘don’t worry, I’m getting other colors out’. She ended up going with a dark blue.

like seriously this woman was shitting herself over the color of an instrument that her son is going to put his mouth all over that looks like u know what. but whatever. keep ur unecessarily gendered things u scrub.

people talk about how simple “femnism is about equality” one liners do not capture the entirety of feminism.

storyofaquietgirl:

So I got to thinking about what I would say feminism is and I think I would say:

feminism is working to dismantle oppressive systems and constantly rethinking our unconscious prejudice/bias. it is about intersectional equality. Being a feminist means checking yourself, unteaching yourself harmful thoughts, and being outraged about current inequality. 

this applies to boys and girls. I think there is active feminism and passive feminism…. idk, what do you think?

bemusedlybespectacled:

okay so everyone’s making “steve rogers freaks out the media with his rampant progressivism” posts but

imagine bruce banner

bruce banner, who has lived in poverty, who has been an undocumented worker, who has seen what happens in sweatshops in india and greenhouses in colombia, fighting to dismantle capitalism and take down the exploitive conditions that come with it

bruce banner, who isn’t doing anything with the massive salary tony pays him for “R&D work” (actually just him and tony in the lab but, hey, tony likes giving people stuff even if they don’t particularly want or need it) so he spends it all on a fund for abused children and personally hires lawyers and therapists for them because maybe he can’t have kids of his own but he can make damn sure that no one goes through what he went through

bruce banner, who fights against climate change and fracking and tapping national parks for resources, and tony ends up making a whole campaign around it called “go green with hulk” which bruce gets very annoyed by but “it tested well with focus groups, jolly green” so it goes through anyway and becomes massively popular

bruce going a little green around the pupils if someone so much as breathes the word “autism” and “vaccine” in the same sentence (and more than a little green if they insinuate that having an autistic child is a bad thing)

bruce fighting for universal health care

bruce working to destigmatize mental illness

bruce hulking out on the set of fox & friends (which predictably becomes a meme)

bruce. fucking. banner.

Amendment One can and will effectively ban abortion in Tennessee.

santhipoma:

-bobella-:

With no exception. None. No exception for the life of the mother. No exception for rape or incest.

If you care at all about the reproductive rights of women, get the word out about this amendment and the horrible consequences it could have for the women of Tennessee and the Midsouth.

From Vote No On One:

Amendment 1 is confusing. What would it actually do?

Today, a woman is left to make decisions about her health with input from her family, her faith and her doctor. Amendment 1 would put the power to make personal, private medical decisions in the hands of our government by allowing them full control to mandate abortion laws–without protections for victims of rape, incest, or cases where the health or life of the woman is in danger.

Why are our privacy rights up for vote?

In 2000, the Tennessee Supreme Court ruled that certain abortion restrictions violated privacy rights under the Tennessee constitution because they only served as barriers to a safe and legal abortion. Since then, anti-abortion lawmakers and activists have passed a series of laws that restrict access to safe abortions for women across the state, and have publicly stated that their ultimate goal is to cut off access altogether.

Is it true that abortion isn’t regulated in Tennessee? Is Amendment 1 necessary for government to regulate abortion?

No and no. From mandatory reporting to the Tennessee Health Department to parental consent for minors, abortion is already highly regulated in Tennessee. Abortion is already incredibly safe: Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that abortion has over a 99 percent safety record. If state legislators wanted to pass more regulations, they wouldn’t need to pass a constitutional amendment. For example, the state legislature passed a law in 2012 requiring doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges at a local hospital. All Amendment 1 would do is allow government to potentially ban abortions in all instances with no exceptions—and that is what’s really dangerous for Tennessee women.

If I’m pro-life, should I vote “Yes” on Amendment 1?

Amendment 1 is not about being pro-life or pro-choice—it’s about defending our right to make private decisions free from government interference. Even if we don’t agree on abortion, we can all agree that government has no place in our private medical decisions. Whether it’s to protect exceptions in tragic situations, stop government interference, or protect our privacy rights and freedom, we all have a reason to vote “No” on Amendment 1.

———————————————

Please reblog and share, guys. This is a massively dangerous piece of legislation that far too few people are aware is even on the ballot.

get out and vote my fellow Tennesseans!

marinashutup:

my favorite thing is when anti-feminists will say things like “i agree with old school feminism but feminists today ruined feminism” and then you read texts from first and second wave feminism and people were making the exact same arguments against them back in the early 1900’s

It’s tempting to believe that this online row – a toxic combination of misinformation, anger and anxious masculinity – is just about one specific technology industry’s subculture, or that it will blow over. But by labeling Gamergate a “gaming problem” and attaching a hashtag to it, we’re putting unnecessary boundaries around a broader but nebulous issue: threats and harassment are increasingly how straight white men deal with a world that no longer revolves exclusively around them.

- Gamergate is loud, dangerous and a last grasp at cultural dominance by angry white men, my latest at the Guardian US (via jessicavalenti)

I will close Guantanamo Bay.

- Barack Obama (2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014)

(Source: ronpaulproblems)

experimentalmadness:

And you know what.

Shout out to bisexual individuals who haven’t been in any relationships yet, or have only ever been in a relationship with one gender.

You don’t owe anyone any kind of explanation about your identity.

You are amazing and wondrously bisexual just the way you are.

letterstomycountry:

Via A Mighty Girl:

Professional hacker Parisa Tabriz is responsible for keeping the nearly billion users of Google Chrome safe by finding vulnerabilities in their system before malicious hackers do. Tabriz, a “white hat” hacker who calls herself Google’s “Security Princess”, is head of the company’s information security engineering team. The 31-year-old Polish-Iranian-American is also an anomaly in Silicon Valley according to a recent profile in The Telegraph: “Not only is she a woman – a gender hugely under-represented in the booming tech industry – but she is a boss heading up a mostly male team of 30 experts in the US and Europe.”Tabriz came up with “Security Princess” while at a conference and the unusual title is printed on her business card. “I knew I’d have to hand out my card and I thought Information Security Engineer sounded so boring,” she says. “Guys in the industry all take it so seriously, so security princess felt suitably whimsical.” Her curiosity, mischievousness, and innovative thinking are all assets in her business: a high-profile company like Google is constantly in the crosshairs of so-called “black hat” hackers.Tabriz came into internet security almost by accident; at the University of Illinois’ computer engineering program, her interest was first whetted by the story of early hacker John Draper, who became known as Captain Crunch in the 1960s after he learned how to make free long-distance calls using a toy whistle from a Cap’n Crunch cereal box. She realized that, to beat the hackers of today, she had to be prepared for similar — but more advanced — out-of-the-box thinking.While women at still very under-represented in the tech industry — Google recently reported that only 30% of its staff is female — Tabriz has hope for the future: “[F]ifty years ago there were similar percentages of women in medicine and law, now thankfully that’s shifted.” And, while she hasn’t encountered overt sexism at Google, when she was offered the position, at least one classmate said, “you know you only got it cos you’re a girl.” To help address this imbalance, she mentors under-16 students at a yearly computer science conference that teaches kids how to “hack for good” — and she especially encourages girls to pursue internet security work. One 16-year-old who attended, Trinity Nordstrom, says, “Parisa is a good role model, because of her I’d like to be a hacker.”Tabriz, who was named by Forbes as one of the “top 30 under 30 to watch” in 2012, also wants the public to realize that hacking can be used for positive ends. “[H]acking can be ugly,” she says. “The guy who published the private photos of those celebrities online made headlines everywhere. What he did was not only a violation of these women but it was criminal, and as a hacker I was very saddened by it. I feel like we, the hackers, need better PR to show we’re not all like that… [A]fter all I’m in the business of protecting people.”To read more about Google’s “Security Princess” in The Telegraph, visit http://bit.ly/Z6Z5RG

letterstomycountry:

Via A Mighty Girl:

Professional hacker Parisa Tabriz is responsible for keeping the nearly billion users of Google Chrome safe by finding vulnerabilities in their system before malicious hackers do. Tabriz, a “white hat” hacker who calls herself Google’s “Security Princess”, is head of the company’s information security engineering team. The 31-year-old Polish-Iranian-American is also an anomaly in Silicon Valley according to a recent profile in The Telegraph: “Not only is she a woman – a gender hugely under-represented in the booming tech industry – but she is a boss heading up a mostly male team of 30 experts in the US and Europe.”

Tabriz came up with “Security Princess” while at a conference and the unusual title is printed on her business card. “I knew I’d have to hand out my card and I thought Information Security Engineer sounded so boring,” she says. “Guys in the industry all take it so seriously, so security princess felt suitably whimsical.” Her curiosity, mischievousness, and innovative thinking are all assets in her business: a high-profile company like Google is constantly in the crosshairs of so-called “black hat” hackers.

Tabriz came into internet security almost by accident; at the University of Illinois’ computer engineering program, her interest was first whetted by the story of early hacker John Draper, who became known as Captain Crunch in the 1960s after he learned how to make free long-distance calls using a toy whistle from a Cap’n Crunch cereal box. She realized that, to beat the hackers of today, she had to be prepared for similar — but more advanced — out-of-the-box thinking.

While women at still very under-represented in the tech industry — Google recently reported that only 30% of its staff is female — Tabriz has hope for the future: “[F]ifty years ago there were similar percentages of women in medicine and law, now thankfully that’s shifted.” And, while she hasn’t encountered overt sexism at Google, when she was offered the position, at least one classmate said, “you know you only got it cos you’re a girl.” To help address this imbalance, she mentors under-16 students at a yearly computer science conference that teaches kids how to “hack for good” — and she especially encourages girls to pursue internet security work. One 16-year-old who attended, Trinity Nordstrom, says, “Parisa is a good role model, because of her I’d like to be a hacker.”

Tabriz, who was named by Forbes as one of the “top 30 under 30 to watch” in 2012, also wants the public to realize that hacking can be used for positive ends. “[H]acking can be ugly,” she says. “The guy who published the private photos of those celebrities online made headlines everywhere. What he did was not only a violation of these women but it was criminal, and as a hacker I was very saddened by it. I feel like we, the hackers, need better PR to show we’re not all like that… [A]fter all I’m in the business of protecting people.”

To read more about Google’s “Security Princess” in The Telegraph, visit http://bit.ly/Z6Z5RG

queen-mzbigabootie:

haneefistheonlyone:

kwamejaw:

Im pretty sure I walk past a lot more cops than that

queen-mzbigabootie:

haneefistheonlyone:

kwamejaw:

Im pretty sure I walk past a lot more cops than that

image

(Source: neonarizona)